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Silver Static
Maria. Portugal.

(Source: pomppageantryokc)

Some daily conversations of Dean Winchester 

(Source: darlingcap)

stilesdelgado:

(ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧

(Source: deanmichaelwinchester)

140526

(Source: bennyisherp)

bluestockingbookworm:

book-answers:

But think of this, Books

This just made me so very happy.

penguinteenaus:

tilly-and-her-books:

Today the postman dropped off another parcel full of books for me and told me I should get a life. Like hello? I’m living several lives in several worlds with these books you just delivered for me!

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bookmad:

one of my favorite hobbies is staying up extremely late to read and pretending like i won’t regret it later

bunchofpeasants:

soras-majestic-butt:

do you ever catch yourself thinking of something so weird and fucked up that you have to stop mid-thought and your face is

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Kuzko has rly strong brows

sebastian-stand:

dioburandou:

zolro:

I love it when Google Chrome screws up and they’re like “Fuck it here’s a tiny dinosaur pixel”

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NOOO WHY DOES NO ONE GET IT REMEMBER THE SCENE IN ‘MEET THE ROBINSONS’?

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GOOGLE CHROME SHOWS THAT LITTLE DINOSAUR PIXEL BECAUSE THEY CAN’T REACH THE WEBPAGE

accidently:

accidently:

littlebreadstick:

accidently:

my seventeenth birthday is in a few weeks…and I’m actually kind of sad…i really like being sixteen

but if your sixteen you cant be the dancing queen

thank u little bread stick that made me feel better 

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this is the best thing to happen to one of my text posts

ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.

Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 

A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.

Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.

Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.